Survive the Zombie Apocalypse with these Accessibility Resources

So I gave this post an extreme title, but imagine this. Much of the Web goes down and for whatever reason, you can only access a handful of resources to help you create accessible websites. Which ones rise to the top?

I created a huge list of resources recently, and Steve Faulkner at The Paciello Group posted his favorites. But if I had to narrow down the list, here are the six resources I would use to “survive” and still create accessible sites.

My Favorite Accessibility Resources

  1. WebAIM.org: This site and the information there functions like an encyclopedia for important concepts in web accessibility. I use it every day and it’s often my first stop in a search.
  2. Wave: Created by the staff at WebAIM, Wave helps you evaluate the accessibility of  web pages by showing you errors, color contrast details and additional accessibility information. The tool comes in a few different flavors, including a web version and browser plugins.
  3. The Paciello Group Blog: Written by the staff at the Paciello Group, its blog contains some of the most thorough and current information on topics like HTML5, accessibility APIs and more.
  4. The Simply Accessible Blog: Similar to The Paciello Group’s blog, Simply Accessible’s blog combines the latest information on topics along with demos and straight-forward opinions on tough-to-solve accessibility concerns.
  5. The Color Contrast Analyzer: I use a few different color analysis tools, but if I had to pick one in the absence of the rest, this is it. Maintained by the staff at the Paciello Group, one of my favorite features allows you to test colors that have opacity.
  6. Screen Reader: It doesn’t really matter which one, but I would want one. I would pick Voiceover, on a Mac, since it’s the one I’m most familiar with.

Good luck avoiding those zombies and keeping the Web accessible!

Image courtesy of Pexels.com.